Center for Advanced Management
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Sprachumschaltung

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Prof. Dr. Abbie Griffin (University of Utah)

Programm

Datum: 17.04.2018

Zeit: 13.00 - 15.00 Uhr

Ort: Ludwigstr. 28, VG, Raum 211b

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Titel: Publishing out of standardized data sets: Understanding associated challenges and how to overcome them (with an illustrative research project)

In this talk, Prof. Griffin will outline a set of publishing challenges scholars might be confronted with when relying primarily on large, standardized data sets in a research project. The discussion will include typical reviewer and editor criticisms as well as potential ways to overcome these. To illustrate, Prof. Griffin will present a research project that examines the relative value of locally customized new product introduction strategies (see abstract below).

The market benefits (and liabilities) of developing and commercializing “local” products vs. nationally branded products
Jake D. Hoskins, Assistant Professor of Marketing, Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business, Westminster College
Abbie Griffin, Royal L. Garff Presidential Chair in Marketing, David Eccles School of Business, University of Utah
J. Cameron Verhaal, Assistant Professor of Management, J. Mack Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University

Abstract

This research theoretically develops a coherent perspective on the strategic advantages and disadvantages of local marketing – developing and commercializing new products for local markets rather than for national distribution. Viewpoints are drawn across the country-of-origin, authenticity and identity literatures to build theoretically sound expectations for the potential strategic value (and limitations) of a local new product development and marketing strategy. It is argued that local marketing allows the producer to better serve its consumer segments with tailored products and to build a brand image advantage through the connection of the brand with the consumer, as well as the connection of the consumer with his or her own sense of place. Predictions that these advantages will allow a local product development and marketing strategy to establish consumer perceptual advantages that translate into market performance advantages are tested across three studies. We also test some related market performance benefits and liabilities of a local product development and marketing strategy including competitive effects, impact on growth and expansion outcomes and the ability of producer to leverage marketing assets and investments.